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Support for Children

Hello

I would like to hear from anyone who has any good resources or supports I could access for my daughter (8) to access following her father’s involuntary admission to hospital for treatment following paranoid/psychotic behaviours. Unsure how long he will be in treatment but feel this is the best option atm despite him insisting that he shouldn’t be there and has no issues...and obviously our daughter has heard these kinds of statements and seen some erratic behaviour, I believe. Any advice or help would be great and much appreciated as I don’t want this to have a negative impact upon her and am worried she isn’t sharing with me any concerns she has and that she needs professional help to deal with this situation. 

5 REPLIES 5

Re: Support for Children

Hi @Mum_of_MissL  and welcome to the forum. 

I have been in a similar situation when my wife spent an extended period in hospital so feel for you. Our hospital stay was officially voluntary but only remained that way as long as darling agreed to be there so still traumatic for the children. During a period of ~12 months we had 6+ hospital admissions totalling more than 4 months collectively. 

 

During our crisis we were able to get support through an organisation Headspace z-12 (for children under 12yo) program. Unfortunately this program has been discontinued due to funding but depending on your area there may be something similar. 

Our son has been seeing another councillor at another organisation that is specific to our location as he still struggles even though hes mum has been home for a while now. I was able to find this service with the  help of a university councillor that I see. (I work and study at a university). Unfortunately I have found that GPs are not  necessarily  aware of all community based services but always a good place to start. And not all councillors get the significance of my concerns so if you are not happy with a first try it is always good to try someone new. Our GP is always helpful and happy to look into different services that I have asked about. 

 

Re: Support for Children

I am the daughter of 2 parents who had issues.  I believe it is important NOT to block her realationship completely with her father, as my mother did, when one side makes out the other has all the issues. It was the few beautiful things that he did for me that enabled me to survive.  It can be frightening for all, but kindness and guidance within the system are important.  I visited my dad in hospital at 10.  Truth compassion and real relationship is the only way through.  It can be a danger to magnify the issues of one side.

Re: Support for Children

I want to agree with @Appleblossom 

(Unless safety is an issue) it is important for our children to have a continued  relationship and still be able to see their parents. We have 3 boys (all 12 and under when their mum was last  in hospital) and they all visited herein hospital. 

(*important to note that this was in a private hospital in an environment that enables this) and they spoke daily on the phone. 

Re: Support for Children

Hi @Mum_of_MissL, we're sorry to hear that you are going through this tough time. Have you checked in with your local community centre for resources? That may be a good place to start, alternatively, you can check out this page from SANE on support for carers and families: https://www.sane.org/spotlight-on/families-carers/35-what-support-is-available-for-carers

Re: Support for Children

Hello,

Does anyone know of professionals or services that provide conselling to teenagers who have a parent with a mental illness?

I'm looking for someone compassionate but experienced in mental health to guide a teenager who's living with a parent with bipolar disorder.

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